When it comes to drilling, you will quickly find out that there is more than just one type of drilling rig. In fact there are several different types. The kind of rig that you select will depend upon the drilling requirement that each drill site has.

Land Based Drilling Rig – This drill is one that is for land use and is probably the most common one that is used for different types of land exploration. Sites that use these types of drills are generally smaller pieces of land so the drills are smaller and much more efficient than ones they have used in the past.

Slim Hole Drilling Rig – When comparing this drill to a more conventional drill you will see a big difference in size. The conventional drill bore can be 18 inches in size and this one can be as small as six inches in size. This type of drill can drill a well to over 14,000 feet and will produce just one third the amount of rock that a standard well will produce. Slim hole drilling however, is not always feasible in all kinds of environments.

Coiled Tubing Drill Rigs – Often conventional wells that are drilled in sections with rigid pipes will form the drill string and sometimes they will cause coiled tubing to replace a normal drill string to create a continuous length of pipe that is wound on a spool. The benefits of using this is that there is less drilling waste and less equipment footprints. So it’s great for those concerned about environmentally sensitive places.

Jackup Drill Rigs – These rigs are normally used for very shallow water areas that are less than 300 feet in depth. This is actually a floating barge that contains the drill structure that is fitted with long support legs that are raised or lowered independently. This drill rig is towed into place with its legs up and section that is the barge is floating on the surface of the water. Once they find the location to drill they will then lower the legs into place to secure the barge. The jackup rig is very sturdy and can even withstand tough ocean storms and high waves.

Semi-Submersible Rigs – These rigs are for drilling in water that is deeper than 300 feet because it demands a floating platform. These rigs are floating rigs that are supported by huge pontoon structures that are below the surface of the sea. Like the jackup rigs, the decks are elevated as high as 100 feet or more above the parts that are in contact with the sea and they minimize loading from waves and wind. These rigs can operate in many different water depths that include even very deep water. They can be attached to the bottom of the ocean by using very strong chains and wire cables and can remain quite stationary without the use of anchors.

Drill Ship – For types of exploration that is far off shore, ships can have rigs mounted on them that can drill down to 10,000 feet. These float and are attached to the ocean bottom by mooring and anchoring systems. Some however, use dynamic position to stay stationary while drilling and use no anchors.

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